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Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Aflatoxin 01/30/2013
Aflatoxins are toxins produced by a mold that grows in nuts, seeds, and legumes. Function: Although aflatoxins are known to cause cancer in animals, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows them at low levels in nuts, seeds, and legumes because they are considered "unavoidable contaminants." The FDA believes occasionally eating small amounts of aflatoxin poses little risk over a lifetime. It is not practical to attempt to remove aflatoxin from food products in order to make them safer.
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Age-appropriate diet for children 09/21/2011
Diet - age appropriate Function: Food Sources: Side Effects: Recommendations: BIRTH TO 4 MONTHS OF AGE During the first 4 - 6 months of life, infants need only breast milk or formula to meet all their nutritional needs. If breastfeeding, a newborn may need to nurse 8 - 12 times per day (every 2 - 4 hours), or on demand.
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Caffeine in the diet 05/05/2011
Diet - caffeine Function: Caffeine is absorbed and passes quickly into the brain. It does not collect in the bloodstream or get stored in the body. It leaves the body in the urine many hours after it has been consumed.
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Calcium in diet 02/14/2011
Diet - calcium Function: Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the the human body. Calcium helps form and maintain healthy teeth and bones. Proper levels of calcium over a lifetime can help prevent osteoporosis . Calcium helps your body with: Building strong bones and teeth Clotting blood Sending and receiving nerve signals Squeezing and relaxing muscles Releasing hormones and other chemicals Keeping a normal heartbeat Food Sources: CALCIUM AND DAIRY PRODUCTS Many foods contain calcium, but dairy products are the best source.
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Carbohydrates 05/16/2012
Starches; Simple sugars; Sugars; Complex carbohydrates; Diet - carbohydrates; Simple carbohydrates Function: The primary function of carbohydrates is to provide energy for the body, especially the brain and the nervous system. An enzyme called amylase helps break down carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar), which is used for energy by the body.
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Celiac disease - nutritional considerations 02/19/2012
Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, or sometimes oats (including medications). When a person with celiac disease eats or drinks anything containing gluten, the immune system responds by damaging the lining of the intestinal tract. This damage affects the body's ability to absorb nutrients. For specific information about the disease (including symptoms and treatment), see: Celiac disease .
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Chloride in diet 02/18/2013
Chloride is found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. It is an important part of the salt found in many foods and used in cooking. Function: Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids. It is an essential part of digestive (stomach) juices. Food Sources: Chloride is found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods with higher amounts of chloride include seaweed, rye, tomatoes, lettuce, celery, and olives.
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Chromium in diet 02/18/2013
Diet - chromium Function: Chromium is important in the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates . Chromium stimulates fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis, which are important for brain function and other body processes. Chromium is also important in the breakdown (metabolism) of insulin. Food Sources: The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast, but many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes bloating ( abdominal distention ) and nausea .
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Cooking utensils and nutrition 04/30/2013
Cooking utensils can have an effect on your nutrition. Function: Pots, pans, and other tools used in cooking often do more than just hold the food. The material that they are made from can leach into the food that is being cooked. Common materials used in cookware and utensils are: Aluminum Copper Iron Lead Stainless steel Teflon™ (polytetrafluoroethlyene) Both lead and copper have been linked to illness. Food Sources: Cooking utensils can affect any cooked foods.
Health Illustrated Encyclopedia Copper in diet 02/18/2013
Diet - copper Function: Copper works with iron to help the body form red blood cells. It also helps keep the blood vessels, nerves, immune system, and bones healthy. Food Sources: Oysters and other shellfish , whole grains, beans, nuts, potatoes, and organ meats (kidneys, liver) are good sources of copper. Dark leafy greens, dried fruits such as prunes, cocoa, black pepper, and yeast are also sources of copper in the diet.
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